Warning – Ancestry Trees Are Not Always Fact

Below is what I posted on Facebook today after getting another reply from someone with an obviously flawed tree on Ancestry.  I had a DNA match with this person and questioned the facts they had for a common ancestor. This tree wasn’t all that bad. They had the correct names and it was only for the furthest back individual that is seems people were trying to “force” facts for.  I hadn’t been able to find any facts for that individual and wondered about sources for some of the “facts” out there. Turns out..there is no source. Another person’s Ancestry tree is NOT a source.

Ancestry Tree
 

Ok.. Ancestry “Tree” rant! Beware of member submitted trees. I’d say that at least 90% of the trees I look at are wrong. People who don’t do “good” research post a tree.. other people do a search.. the bad tree shows up.. they assume it’s true and just copy it to their account. It snowballs. The message below is one I got today in reply to a question on a tree that I suspect is wrong. This is almost always the response I get. When you do a DNA test and a person has a tree attached.. it doesn’t mean those are your ancestors!! “Thru Lines” are often based on incorrect information. Trees on Ancestry are a good place to get clues- but DO THE RESEARCH YOURSELF!! Double check facts. Ancestry just wants your money – they don’t care if the info you get is wrong! /endrant

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A DNA Match Helps Solve A Surname Mystery

Fair Haven Connecticut

My 3X Great Grandmother was Eliza Harrison Connolly. She was the grandmother of Richard Harrison Wardell. She was born in Ireland and lived in New Haven, CT.  Her maiden name was a bit of a mystery.  I originally had Elizabeth’s surname as “McTeague”, but I didn’t know where I got that from. Finally when I found son, Frank Harrison’s, birth record, it listed her surname as “McIntyre”.  On her daughter, Sarah’s, death record in 1864 Eliza’s maiden name looks like “Montague” which at that time I assumed could be phonetic spelling of the first maiden name I had listed,  “McTeague”.

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